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How to begin raw feeding dogs

Discussion in 'Pets' started by Oluomoadebayo, Jan 15, 2017.

  1. Oluomoadebayo

    Oluomoadebayo Moderator Staff Member

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    Starting with chicken is simplest because the bones in chicken are really soft and edible. Just buy whole chickens (make sure they have no more than 100mg of sodium per 4oz [or 120g] serving), and start to feeding. The general starting guideline is 2-3% of ideal adult weight per day. You can always adjust amounts when you need to, and feeding a bit less than needed can be easier on the newbie tummies than feeding too much.

    When they're puppies, that should be split into several meals. So for a 9 week old, give him that amount split into four meals a day. As they get older, you can feed fewer meals. After 4 or so months, you can feed in three meals, and after 6 or so months, you can feed two meals a day. After they're a year old, you can feed one meal per day. Keep an eye on his weight, and adjust the daily amount as needed to keep him lean. The 2-3% is just a start, you will adjust for your dog's energy level and needs.All but the smallest and youngest dogs should be able to eat all the bones very quickly, as chicken bones are very soft. You can give him a head start the first few days, by cutting ribbons into the skin, but most healthy dogs should have no problem, and even those with some teeth removed can learn to eat raw.

    After an adjustment period, you can add other meats. I like pork as a second meat, as it's a cheap red meat and easy to find, and it's got pretty soft bones too; all except the tiniest can eat at least some pork bones. Other good meats to look for are beef, goat, venison, lamb, veal, rabbit, turkey, duck, kangaroo, emu, pretty much anything, as long as it isn't enhanced with a saline or broth solution. Again, your upper limit will be 100mg of sodium per 4oz (or 120g) serving. Slowly replace the chicken with the new meat, working up to whole meals of the new meat. It's better to feed some edible bone with a new meat, either chicken or from the new meat. Your ultimate goal is going to be to feed lots and lots of meat (as much red meat as you can), a bit of edible bone, and eventually some organ. In numbers, that's about 80% meat (flesh, fat, skin, sinew, etc), 10% edible bone, and 10% organ, half of which is liver. Tongue and heart are fed as meat, not organ. Organs include liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, glands (sweetbreads), eyes, brains... Edible bone firms up stool, organs loosen it. So does meat, to a lesser degree. Whole chickens have a fairly high bone content, but that's fine in the beginning, because newly raw fed dogs can have loose stools as a reaction to the switch, and the higher bone content can help keep it manageable. But eventually (meaning weeks or months down the road), you want to lower the amount of bone you'll feed. That's easy to do when you start adding red meat.

    The bones you want to avoid feeding are bare naked bones (meaning those that aren't covered with meat), and the weight-bearing bones of large animals, such as beef, elk, moose, bison, elephant, okay you get the picture. Don't feed those bones that have to hold up a huge animal. Those will break the teeth of your pet, sooner or later. Some buzz-words to look out for--and avoid--are soup bones, marrow bones, femur bones, knuckle bones, dog bones. Don't waste your money, and don't risk their teeth.

    Once you're comfortable feeding chicken, and maybe one other meat, you can add organs. START SLOWLY. Liver is non-negotiable, but it need be only a small part of the diet, somewhere around 5%. But it provides nutrients that are not available in other parts of a prey animal, so it's an important 5%. Okay, so start small, like with a bite's worth of liver. Some dogs adore liver and take to it immediately, while others are put off to its texture or taste. If you have a hesitant liver eater, try offering it frozen. Or half-frozen. Or searing it for a second or two in a screaming hot pan. Or dropping it "accidentally" on the floor. Or giving it as a treat for a difficult trick. You get the idea. Another option is to offer livers from different animals. Chicken liver, pork liver, and beef liver all taste very different (heck, even calf's liver tastes different from beef liver), and your dog might have a preference. As for other organs, feed a small amount of whatever organs you find. Variety is good, but don't spend an inordinate amount of energy searching.

    Once organs are accepted, you'll use your knowledge of your dog to decide how often to offer them. Some dogs can eventually eat organ-only meals, some never can without having very loose stools. Some people prefer to offer a small amount of organ very often, while others give a few organ meals per month. There's no right way to do it, as long as it works for you and your dog, and basically achieves the 5% liver, 5% other organ goal. Again, the beauty of raw is its flexibility, making it work for your dog and your family.

    No vegetables, no grains, the diet should be nothing but meat, bones, and organs.

    For a healthy dog, the only supplement you might consider is a good quality fish oil, especially if you feed mostly supermarket meat, which tends to be grain fed and grain finished. That means that the Omega 3:Omega 6 ratios are out of whack. A good fish oil (not cod liver oil) will bring the ratios back into balance. For fish oil, a maintenance dose (to bring Omega 3:Omega 6 ratios back in line) is 100mg DHA+EPA per 10lb of dog. A 100 pound dog would get 1000mg DHA+EPA total, daily. A typical gelcap contains 300mg DHA+EPA. Don't go by the number on the front of the bottle, read the back, and make sure you're reading per gelcap, not per serving.

    As to where to feed, that's up to you. Mine eats on a portion of a shower curtain. Other people might feed outside (yes, even in winter), on a towel, in a crate, on a small rug, wherever works for your dog and your family. Teach him to eat in one spot by being consistent. If he starts to move it off his spot, you pick it up, settle him back on his spot, and put the food back. Repeat until he "gets it." Be extremely consistent, and it usually only takes a few days for them to know that food stays where you say.

    Ntombi A. Peters
     
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  2. Gertn

    Gertn Active Member

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    But I was told Monringa is good for dogs, why no vegetable is recommended here?
     
  3. Oluomoadebayo

    Oluomoadebayo Moderator Staff Member

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    Will dog eat moringa in the wild?
     
  4. Gertn

    Gertn Active Member

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    No but must animals in the wild eat only organic stuffs unlike the ones we are feeding right now, we must find a way to make up with that.
     

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